Your spending data may reveal aspects of your personality

How you spend your money can signal aspects of your personality, according to research published in Psychological Science. Analyses of over 2 million spending records from more than 2,000 individuals indicate that when people spend money in certain categories, this can be used to infer certain personality traits, such as how materialistic they are or how much self-control they tend to have. “Now that most people spend their money electronically – with billions of payment cards in circulation worldwide – we can study these spending patterns at scale like never before,”…

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Legalized recreational marijuana a substitute for alcohol, but not tobacco

The recent wave of recreational cannabis legalization across the U.S. could generate $22 billion in sales per year, but not everyone is happy about it. New research to be published in an upcoming edition of the INFORMS journal Marketing Science, titled, “Asymmetric Effects of Recreational Cannabis Legalization,” shows the alcohol industry could be impacted when the substance is legalized. “It appears the alcohol industry has a valid reason to be concerned about legal marijuana and may need creative strategies to avoid market decline if it passes,” said Pengyuan Wang, an assistant…

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Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS

A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS. ALS patients are categorized either as familial – meaning two or more people in their family have had the disease, which in their case is linked to inherited genetic mutations – or sporadic, which accounts for about 90% of the cases. Sporadic means the cause or causes are unknown.…

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Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Research study led by the University of Exeter, published in Scientific Reports and moneyed by NIHR, discovered that people who spend at least 120 minutes in nature a week are substantially most likely to report good health and greater mental wellbeing than those who don’t visit nature at all during an average week. Nevertheless, no such advantages were found for individuals who visited natural settings such as town parks, woodlands, nation parks and beaches for less than 120 minutes a week. The research study used information from almost 20,000 individuals…

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An extra burger meal a day eats the brain away

The typical individual eats many more calories than they did 50 years back– comparable to an additional fast-food hamburger meal every day– which is having ravaging outcomes for our brains and waistlines, an ANU health expert cautions. Professor Nicolas Cherbuin, the lead author of new research released in Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, said brain health can decrease much previously in life than previously thought due, in large part, to a society that promotes unhealthy lifestyle choices. ” People are gnawing at their brain with a truly bad fast-food diet and little-to-no…

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Daddy shaming happens too

One present some fathers might desire for Father’s Day: not being judged for their parenting style. About half of dads in a brand-new nationwide survey state they have dealt with criticism and second-guessing about their parenting choices on everything from what they feed their kids to how they have fun with them. And while numerous daddies say they react to criticism in a positive method, such as making a modification to some aspect of their parenting (49 percent) or looking for more info on the topic (40 percent), others had…

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Overdose, Suicide Among Leading Reasons for Postpartum Maternal Deaths

Overdoses and suicides were amongst the most typical factors for mothers dying within a year of delivering in California, according to a brand-new study published this week. Psychiatric public health Professor Sidra Goldman-Mellor, a public health scientist with the School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts and the Health Sciences Research Institute, and her associate, Professor Claire Margerison, a perinatal epidemiologist at Michigan State University, studied more than 1 million California hospital records from 2010 to 2012 to examine the most typical causes of post-partum death. The study was funded…

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12 genes at the root of multiple sclerosis identified

An international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia has made a scientific advance they hope will lead to the development of preventative treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS). In a study published today in PLOS Genetics, researchers found mutations in 12 genes believed to be largely responsible for the onset of MS in families with multiple members diagnosed with the disease. “These genes are like a lighthouse illuminating where the root cause of MS is,” said lead author Carles Vilariño-Güell, assistant professor in the UBC faculty of medicine’s…

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Ultrasound method restores dopaminergic pathway in brain at Parkinson’s early stages

While there are several thousand drugs available to treat a wide range of brain diseases, from depression to schizophrenia, they cannot penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain. The BBB, which protects the brain from pathogens that may be present in blood, also prevents most drugs from gaining access to the brain functional tissue, the parenchyma, a well-known challenge to the treatment of all brain diseases including neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s. A team led by Elisa Konofagou, Robert and Margaret Hariri Professor of Biomedical Engineering and…

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Smartphone relaxation app helps some manage migraine

Migraine sufferers who used a smartphone-based relaxation technique at least twice a week experienced on average four fewer headache days per month, a new study shows. Developed in part by researchers at NYU School of Medicine, the app, called RELAXaHEAD, guides patients through progressive muscle relaxation, or PMR. In this form of behavioral therapy, patients alternately relax and tense different muscle groups to reduce stress. The study authors say their work, publishing in the journal Nature Digital Medicine online June 4, is the first to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of an app…

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